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Malaysia Airlines Flight Goes Missing En Route to China - Flight MH370

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  • An article:

    How Flight 370 Could Have Become a Zombie

    This is the sort of analysis that needs to be applied.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by smay69 View Post
      I realised I could test this by just playing back that night, filtering by registration (on this site the registration field quotes the ID but also a 24 bit address, so I assume the ADS-B info includes the 24 bit address and this site has a mapping to the registration ID) and watching to see if it re-emerged anywhere after it disappeared based on the 24 bit address. It didn't. There were rumblings of Squawk code swapping, but the 24 bit address wouldn't change. Does this site get the ICAO addressees based on the ADS-B data directly, or is that somehow looked up based on Squawk code? I can't imagine the Squawk could actually be trusted for anything.
      As pointed out in FAQ and other ADSB how-to, yes. Address is sent as part of the packet header in binary. It is then coded to hexidecimal by software before being sent to the servers. (or at the server) on reception it matches these IDs with the known registration numbers.

      Addresses are country specific, and sometimes airline reserved.

      a;a

      Example of an ICAO 24-bit address:

      Hexadecimal: AC82EC
      Decimal: 11305708
      Octal: 53101354
      Binary: 101011001000001011101100 (Note: occasionally, spaces are added for visual clarity, thus 1010 1100 1000 0010 1110 1100)
      Thus those 'it changed to act as a different aircraft' theories get thrown out the window by those who have a grip on the technology.

      Squawk codes are flight-specific identifiers. Added in by crew as instructed by ATC on departing. These can be changed mid-flight to cause alert priority on the ATC screens in emergency to the 7xxx range denoting the sub emergency

      Now back to the topic at hand..
      Posts not to be taken as official support representation - Just a helpful uploader who tinkers

      Comment


      • Originally posted by smay69 View Post
        I realised I could test this by just playing back that night, filtering by registration (on this site the registration field quotes the ID but also a 24 bit address, so I assume the ADS-B info includes the 24 bit address and this site has a mapping to the registration ID) and watching to see if it re-emerged anywhere after it disappeared based on the 24 bit address. It didn't. There were rumblings of Squawk code swapping, but the 24 bit address wouldn't change. Does this site get the ICAO addressees based on the ADS-B data directly, or is that somehow looked up based on Squawk code? I can't imagine the Squawk could actually be trusted for anything.
        This site receives the ICAO code directly. In fact this code is the only way to discriminate between packets received. The aircraft registration is not transmitted in ADS-B or Mode S (although it is sometimes entered in as the flight number / call sign). The flight number / call sign is transmitted in ADS-B.

        On this site the ICAO code is referred to as "Hex".

        Comment


        • Ok. For the technically inclined I found the SITA paper describing (unfortunately not as detailed as I would like) the ACARS to INMARSAT satellite link.

          https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...62922401,d.bmk

          An excerpt:

          "The ACARS system was expanded to use the Aeronautical Mobile Satellite System (AMSS)..... to use the INMARSAT AMSS service an aircraft must be equipped with a Satellite Data Unit (SDU).......The AECC Characteristic 741 for the Satellite Data Unit specifies the use of an X.25 based protocol...."

          At the risk of giving away my age, I used to log on to the Source and CompuServe via X.25 networks Tymnet and Telenet using my trusty old Apple II back in the day when I was in college. All I can say that the airlines really need to upgrade their technology. The paper does talk about their TCP/IP offering etc but the older aircraft need to be retrofitted.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by MIT EE View Post
            Agreed! The Malaysians are completely unreliable. Wish INMARSAT would realize the info directly.
            I can't really blame Inmarsat for keeping a low profile during all this. Operating a satellite service on that scale is massively expensive, and they need to keep the trust of all of their high paying customers. They can't afford to have their name associated with the circus that the Malaysian government is running.

            The other side of the coin is the news media, who have proved to be equally stupid in their mishandling of the story. Most treat those circle segments as if they were the route that the plane took. One TV commentator decided to move the red arcs into completely different positions, just to suit his whimsy! Even if the reliable sources released good data, the news people would butcher the facts so badly...that nobody dares to speak up, it seems.

            Anyway, the one thing about all this that I know for certain is that we, the public don't have enough information to draw any concrete conclusions. We can make educated guesses, nothing more. I can only hope and pray that the real search parties are bringing their A games to the search.

            Comment


            • Don't believe everything you hear from the media. Treat it as speculation/rumour.
              F-YSWG1 and T-YSWG2

              Comment


              • John Young, general manager for the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA), said at a press conference in Canberra yesterday that an extended analysis of consecutive "pings" from the MH370 had been made in order to produce a better estimate of the aircraft's flight path.

                Further more, he asserted that the updated flight path estimate could be mirrored at the equator, to show a corresponding possible northern route, based om the same data.

                (See: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_O9gUgWV6U&t=8m51s)

                I've thus made a (quick-n-dirty) graphic estimate of what that refined northern corridor would look like (click on the image for a larger version).

                As you can see, the new path is a bit different than what has been posted earlier (i.e. the arc based only on the last received "ping").

                From the Bay of Bengal, the path roughly follows the border of India and Bangladesh, continues north in between Nepal and Bhutan (still over a part of India), crosses a 2,000-some kilometer part of western China, and ends in the north-west region of China, in the areas bordering to Kazakhstan.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Oblivian View Post
                  Regarding ping vs ping vs ping.

                  They shouldn't have adopted the term. But that's the media for you. They have likely done so in the fact that no-one would understand 'heartbeat' or 'keepalive' transmission. The term is likely taken to attempt to portray this, and combined with what most people can relate to - Sonar. Where the transmission sent out and received on reflection is called... a ping

                  So, if most hear ping.. its the more common term the brain then associates to 'something was sent out or replied to from proving its existence'
                  You might recall that on the first day the press was so wanting there to be a tragic scene for them to cover that they were laser-focused on the ultrasonic "pingers" on the CVR and FDR so that they can be found by sonar. They kept asking why the satellites couldn't find the "pings"... /facepalm

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by mckinley View Post
                    * Can they be disabled by the pilot or another person onboard the airplane?
                    Highly doubtful while in flight.

                    * Are they reliable? Have there been cases where they failed to deploy or activate after a crash into water?
                    No! They are not reliable! I mean, they are as reliable as humanly possible, but the mechanical forces of crash landing destroys these devices quite often. (It's hard to build an antenna that both survives extreme forces and works well.) They're only really useful for relatively soft crash landings (or ditchings).

                    Note that only 406MHz EPIRB beacons can be found by satellite. ELT beacons on 121.5MHz and 243.0MHz GUARD frequencies have a very limited range. All would have run out of battery power by now.

                    Comment


                    • I'm new to this forum, so forgive me if this has been discussed already:

                      Firstly, I wish to thank everyone on this forum, as it is the only place I found where this matter is properly analyzed and discussed. That's why I've registered.

                      Secondly, I cannot believe that no other country's military radar picked this up. Not in this modern world. It's been reported here in Australia about the Malaysian military noting the change of direction. But Aus media is not being very accurate and tend to be a little sensationalist for my liking.
                      It is my contention that there is some big cover up going on. I dont know why that would be.

                      Thanks.
                      Last edited by PM2014; 2014-03-20, 02:56.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by MIT EE View Post
                        At the risk of giving away my age, I used to log on to the Source and CompuServe via X.25 networks Tymnet and Telenet using my trusty old Apple II back in the day when I was in college. All I can say that the airlines really need to upgrade their technology. The paper does talk about their TCP/IP offering etc but the older aircraft need to be retrofitted.
                        LOL...when I was in college we used terminals in the basement to connect to VAX hosts running AT&T UNIX (w/BSD extensions, of course), and from there we connected to other hosts. I can't remember what the network was called back then, but it was an early version of the Internet. I had an Apple II back then too.

                        I've worked at places with X.25 and Frame Relay WAN hookups. I gladly left that to the networking people! Before DSL became widespread, I had ISDN at home, and could connect to work via a blazing 128kbps 2xBRI connection. My dial-up ISP allowed a single BRI at no extra charge, but charged a lot for a 2xBRI bonded channel. Those were the days...

                        Comment


                        • Question Time in the House of Representatives, PM Tony Abbott announced that credible information has been received by AMSA of two objects located, could be linked to MH370. RAAF Orion has been diverted to locate the objects. (Source: Question Time on SkyNews and ABC)

                          http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2014-0...-mh370/5334314
                          Last edited by YSWG; 2014-03-20, 03:21. Reason: add link
                          F-YSWG1 and T-YSWG2

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by YSWG View Post
                            Question Time in the House of Representatives, PM Tony Abbott announced that credible information has been received by AMSA of two objects located, could be linked to MH370. RAAF Orion has been diverted to locate the objects. (Source: Question Time on SkyNews and ABC)

                            http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2014-0...-mh370/5334314
                            There's a massive amount of junk out there on the ocean, I'm guessing what they've spotted at the very least resembles something from a plane as opposed to an object floating on the ocean.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by PM2014 View Post
                              I'm new to this forum, so forgive me if this has been discussed already:

                              Firstly, I wish to thank everyone on this forum, as it is the only place I found where this matter is properly analyzed and discussed. That's why I've registered.
                              Welcome! I'm fairly new here too, but have been fascinated by aviation and airline crashes since I was young. I'm also love a good mystery.

                              I can't speak for anyone but myself, but I'm only an amateur air crash analyst. Certainly not an authority, although I do my best to find authoritative sources. I'd like to think that we're all equals here...except of course for the moderators!

                              Secondly, I cannot believe that no military radar picked this up. Not in this modern world.
                              Well the Malaysian military did claim to have tracked the craft on two instances. The problem is that they keep on changing their story, so nobody knows which version to believe. Myself and others have discussed the matter at length many pages back, if you care to look. Thailand recently came forward with some military radar data too. Perhaps more countries will over time.

                              It is my contention that there is some big cover up going on. I dont know why that would be.
                              I've been told that the Malaysian government is used to operating in secrecy, so their bizarre behavior may be due to the fact that they're unused to having to answer questions truthfully. Perhaps they have more things to hide. Who knows? One theory that I entertained, but I'm sure that nobody wants to be true, is that the Malaysian military shot down the plane for political reasons. That theory briefly got some traction when the next day it was announced that the pilot in command was a member of the opposition party. All I can say is that stranger things have happened. We can only hope that the worst thing being covered up is incompetence.

                              Comment


                              • Thanks Speed Daemon. I appreciate your comments.
                                I will try and read as many back pages as I can, time permitting.

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