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Malaysia Airlines Flight Goes Missing En Route to China - Flight MH370

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  • #46
    Good morning. I remind of Flight 182 corporation Air India, that were destroyed explosion of the day 23.6.1975 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_India_Flight_182). Meanwhile same as through the carbon paper.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Mike View Post
      For me this looks like a big mess.

      * No one noticed that the aircraft was missing during first 6 hours.
      * Malaysia Airlines notified after 6 hours that their aircraft went missing after 2 hours, which during the first 5 search hours focused the search in the jungle between Vietnam and China (estimated location after 2 hours of flying time).
      * 2 or 3 airports in China reported that the aircraft has landed at their airport.
      * After 11 hours Vietnam claimed that their radar data showed that the aircraft went down outside of the Vietnam island Tho Chu.
      * After 36 hours Malaysia claims that their radar data shows that the aircraft tuned around and went down outside the Malaysian cost.

      I think it's amazing how bad information is provided by the different authorities. Do they even own a radar or are they just guessing?
      FR24 received the last signal about half way between Malaysia and Vietnam and I'm quite sure that the aircraft can be found within 30km from that point.
      Not uncommon as at this part of the world, there is very little contingency planning, if there is one. Singapore is the exception probably. And as this was at the border between Lumpur Control and Ho Chi Minh Control, there sure is a lot of conflicting information from both sides to say the least. Only once the plane is located will we know more. But then again, there might be more questions than answers to be discovered.

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      • #48
        Debris spotted but unsure if it belongs to MH370 -- Chinese aviation official


        http://english.astroawani.com/news/s...official-31535

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        • #49
          BiQO9p5CQAAd1-B.jpg large.jpeg
          Debris spotted but unsure if it belongs to MH370 -- Chinese aviation official

          http://english.astroawani.com/news/s...official-31535


          Untitled.jpg
          Last edited by bhavlobhuro; 2014-03-09, 08:17.

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          • #50
            We normally save data once per minute on cruising altitude. Now we have checked all databases and logs and have manage to reproduce some extra data that was not available first, so we have more or less 2 points per minute for the last minutes. I don't think we will be able to get more data than this.

            https://www.dropbox.com/s/9n85w9rvfqxpwza/mh370.PNG

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Mike View Post
              We normally save data once per minute on cruising altitude. Now we have checked all databases and logs and have manage to reproduce some extra data that was not available first, so we have more or less 2 points per minute for the last minutes. I don't think we will be able to get more data than this.

              https://www.dropbox.com/s/9n85w9rvfqxpwza/mh370.PNG
              The position ties in with debris field reported, Mike was there any more data at Zero altitude.

              Civil Aviation Administration of China director Li Jiaxiang said the sighting was made in an "area of longitude 103.29 degrees east and a latitude 6.42 degrees north.


              Read more at: http://english.astroawani.com/news/s...icial-31535?cp
              AMS Daily Fight Information: http://schiphol.dutchplanespotters.nl/

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              • #52
                Many people may be reading this thread as a primary source of information about what happened with flight MH370.

                The positional information FR24 receives is sent from equipment on board the aircraft accurately transmitting the aircraft position, this is different from the old - less accurate system - where a beam of radio waves was sent out and bounced off the metal of the aircraft allowing the aircraft position was calculated. The problem with the new system is that if something goes wrong with the transmitter on the aircraft - then there is no signal to receive and you no longer know where the metal is ... in fact it could be in an area that is not covered by the old radar.

                The signal from MH370 is received by stations up to 400Km away, and at the point where the transmissions stopped - would have been received by several stations both sides of the gulf of Thailand.

                The difficulty now is that because the signal stopped in a particular location does not mean that is where the metal is, since it was flying fast at a height of several kilometres it could have glided on many kilometres or fluttered downwards where it was. Once someone gets close enough to where it is they should pick up transmissions from battery powered emergency transmitters and that should be close to where the rest of the aircraft can be found if it's not been spread too much in the air and water by the time it settled.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by speedbird1960 View Post
                  The position ties in with debris field reported, Mike was there any more data at Zero altitude.
                  +1 to that.. thanks.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Mike View Post
                    We normally save data once per minute on cruising altitude. Now we have checked all databases and logs and have manage to reproduce some extra data that was not available first, so we have more or less 2 points per minute for the last minutes. I don't think we will be able to get more data than this.

                    https://www.dropbox.com/s/9n85w9rvfqxpwza/mh370.PNG
                    Thank you Mike! That's really more interesting.
                    And what about 0 ft readings that we see on replay (when transponder probably stopped getting altitude data from the altimeter)?
                    Do you also have them recorded in your database?

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Mike View Post
                      FR24 received the last signal about half way between Malaysia and Vietnam and I'm quite sure that the aircraft can be found within 30km from that point.
                      I'm just thinking, suppose they had a major electrical failure, with all comm's and transponder lost, wouldn't have been plausible they could have been "gliding" and be way off the last received position?
                      I know, it's a lot of 'if's"
                      Cheers

                      @Peterhr seems that our messages crossed, we somehow had the same thought
                      Last edited by seahorse; 2014-03-09, 08:38.

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                      • #56
                        You would hope that they would glide towards land and be able to communicate by cellphone or something before vanishing.

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                        • #57
                          That's maybe the "turn back" that Malaysia Airlines were talking about??

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by seahorse View Post
                            I'm just thinking, suppose they had a major electrical failure, with all comm's and transponder lost, wouldn't have been plausible they could have been "gliding" and be way off the last received position?
                            I know, it's a lot of 'if's"
                            Cheers

                            @Peterhr seems that our messages crossed, we somehow had the same thought
                            I'm not a specialist in aircraft or 777 construction, but I think that the transponder and some other crucial systems are put on redundant systems with battery back up and should be one of the last things going off on an aircraft. Apart from battery's there is a RAT (air turbine) that should be able to give power in case of electrical problems http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ram_air_turbine

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by seahorse View Post
                              I'm just thinking, suppose they had a major electrical failure, with all comm's and transponder lost, wouldn't have been plausible they could have been "gliding" and be way off the last received position?
                              I know, it's a lot of 'if's"
                              Cheers

                              @Peterhr seems that our messages crossed, we somehow had the same thought
                              In events of major electrical failure, there is a back up - RAT - the Ram Air Turbine which provides power to essential flight instruments.

                              But in this case, just like 1090mhz has said, everything was normal, and then suddenly it dropped out of screen. Vanished. Modern aircrafts don't really drop out of the screen these days. Look at Us Airways 1549, it remained on air after twin engine failure. and the popular Gimli glider (Air Canda 143)in 1983 at Canda. They don't fall out of the sky! Only something catastrophic can bring down a plane that fast. And probably, nothing could be done by the pilots. You are right in that planes do glide if they lose engine power. In this case, from the FR24 data when from FL350 then drops down to 0ft, the omens are not good. It is still early days... and the effort must continue to locate the aircraft.
                              Last edited by North Borneo Radar; 2014-03-09, 08:54.

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by speedbird1960 View Post
                                The position ties in with debris field reported, Mike was there any more data at Zero altitude.
                                There are some 0 yes, but I don't want to speculate where they come from. It could just be bad signal.

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