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Thread: Andre Brandao's Blog - CEO of AirNavSystems.com of RadarBox product.

  1. #31
    Captain Anmer's Avatar
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    Hi Bill

    My post was to try and put your experience into perspective and, hopefully, encourage others to venture into radarspotting at a level that they can afford and with a better understanding of the options and known issues.

    I'm sure you'll get some real enjoyment from your RadarBox. Don't let the bad experience outweigh the benefits now you have it working, albeit on an XP machine instead of Win7 64 bit.
    Mike


    www.radarspotting.com

    Radarspotting since 2005

  2. #32
    Purser BillW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anmer View Post
    Hi Bill

    My post was to try and put your experience into perspective and, hopefully, encourage others to venture into radarspotting at a level that they can afford and with a better understanding of the options and known issues.

    I'm sure you'll get some real enjoyment from your RadarBox. Don't let the bad experience outweigh the benefits now you have it working, albeit on an XP machine instead of Win7 64 bit.
    Morning mate, yes I understand that AND if you want to use my experienced problems with it please do so, not a problem. I do think the problems with Windows 7 64bit should be highlighted to other prospective buyers though.
    I thank you and indeed everyone for their help and advice, I really do.
    Bill

  3. #33
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    Angry

    Sorry you had to find out the hard way after buying the RadarBox product.

    Most of us will never buy something from AirNav Systems ever again.
    We go through too much bullshit to mess with another AirNav Systems product like ShipTrax or others.

    It takes too much time unclicking the "Share Flight Data" box on the Radarbox software every time it's open!. Even on ShipTrax software "Share Ship Data" box.
    365 days per year unclicking the stupid box because it doesn't remember the user settings!

    I never want to go through it again.

  4. #34
    Purser BillW's Avatar
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    Good morning "you lot" LOL,
    What a morning, torrential rain here at the moment, cant get my dog out for a "pee" LOL.
    Anyway, Airnav, well now, last time I was on mine, I set everything up as I wanted it so that next time I start it everything would be fine......"ugh ugh" WRONG !! I went on it last night and everything was back to how it was previously and I had to set it up again.

    Now, I e mailed that "geezer", Andre and sure enough he replied to say one of his support team would be e mailing me.....about 30minutes later I recieved an e mail from someone called Akber who duly apologised and explained all about the problems with starting Airnav on Windows 7 64bit, then he went on to say that because the retailer failed to explain properly that with that Windows programme, I would need to have more drivers, Airnav would like to offer me a FREE 3 months subscription and if I let him know which one I would like he would see to it.
    I have to admit I dont know what he meant, a subscription to what ? But anyway I replied thanking him but I declined the offer.

    At the "end of the day", we buy these equipments in good faith and we do not expect to have all this "hassle" to be able to use them.
    I know, that had I known about the problems with Windows 7 64 bit and Airnav Radar box, I would have kept my money in my pocket. Like you say I learned the hard way, but I feel that although it has been explained to me about the drivers, I sincerely hope that some other poor unsuspecting buyer will not fall for this problem, I still do not think that the problem is still being made general knowledge.

    I DO blame the retailer partly for not informing me, instead of being too quick to "seal a sale", because I had not got the technical knowledge to ask about it, although I did ask if it was ok with windows 7 and he said yes...which in the long run it is, but not before a load of messing about to start with.
    So my feelings toward anything "modern" within our hobby, has been dented, do you blame me ??

    Bill
    Last edited by BillW; 2011-08-26 at 03:50.

  5. #35
    Captain Anmer's Avatar
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    A new RadarBox comes with 12 months "free" subscription to the 5 minute delayed network. That means, if you are connected to the internet, you can "share" traffic with other RadarBox users. But the traffic displays a position 5 minutes earlier. It shows an "historic" location.

    After the free 12 months is up you can pay extra to continue using the service. This costs Euro 8 a month.

    Alternatively you can pay even more for "live" data (not delayed 5 minutes) and this costs Euro 15 a month. I suspect Akbar was offering you three months "free" subscription for the delayed network.

    One thing to bear in mind. The RadarBox default setting is set for your data to be sent to the AirNav server. If you change this preference, it reverts back everytime you start RadarBox.

    In essence, AirNav is selling your data without your permission as the majority of RadarBox users will be unaware of this default setting and that it resets itself the next time you launch the software. There has been much debate about this (at minimum) unethical practice and AirNav refuses to change the default setting to off and to retain the customer's preference. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to undertsand why as this is lucrative business for AirNav.

    Alternatively you can see live shared data for free on FR24 or for a one-off payment of Euro 25 by using PlanePlotter.

    Bottom line is you weren't being offered much and it doesn't cost AirNav anything in the first place.
    Mike


    www.radarspotting.com

    Radarspotting since 2005

  6. #36
    Super Moderator speedbird1960's Avatar
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    This a poor state of affairs, and Bill should be entitled under UK law to his money back.

    This is some of the law regarding 'The Sale Of Goods Act' ( Sorry its a long post. )

    Sale of Goods Act

    The Sale of Goods Act 1979 is perhaps the most useful and relevant to the problems many consumers face when they make purchases on the High Street, online or by mail order. It is worth knowing about this piece of legislation, in terms of what rights you have and how you can resolve the situation, because not all shops can be relied on to act in an honourable or lawful way.

    The main focus of the Act is the provision of three statutory rights, although the act goes on to describe exactly what consumers are entitled to if any of these statutory rights are breached.

    There is some confusion about how the Sale of Goods Act applies to second-hand goods, items purchased on the internet or by mail order, items purchased via a doorstep sale, or anything bought from an online auction or marketplace. This following sections will cover all these situations, and hopefully give you a better understanding of how the law protects you and what you must watch out for.

    It is not fit for purpose

    Your Statutory Rights

    That’s a legitimate claim as long as you are using the item for the purpose for which it was intended. This is the principle of fitness for purpose. There is no point claiming that paint thinner has had adverse effects if it is not being used as paint thinner! Similarly, if you are commissioning the manufacture of a product and do not specify the purposes for which it will be used you will have no recourse if it fails to live up to your expectations.

    How do you measure quality?

    Satisfactory quality is defined as what a ‘reasonable person’ would regard as acceptable, and takes into account factors such as price paid, fitness for purpose specified, appearance and finish, freedom from minor blemishes, safety and durability. If it becomes apparent that an item is not of the quality you were led to expect, you were not aware of any such defect when you bought it, and you bought from a seller acting ‘in the course of a business’ (i.e. not an informal sale), you are quite within your rights to go back to the retailer, even after some months of use. If a product develops a fault within the first 6 months, the assumption will be that this defect was present at the time of purchase and you will not have to prove anything. If you are returning an item after this 6 month time period, this automatic assumption does not apply, and it may be up to you to prove the fault did not occur through misuse. You should also consider aspect of durability and acceptance.

    If it is the case that you were invited to carry out a thorough inspection of the product and fail to spot a defect which that inspection ought to have revealed, you may not have recourse. Safety is an important aspect of quality and we will look at unsafe goods and product liability under different legislation – namely that of the Consumer Protection Act

    Do shops have to give me my money back?

    When you buy something from a shop you are entering into a legally binding contract. Therefore they don’t have to give you a refund simply because you have changed your mind. Only if one of your statutory rights is breached (i.e. that the item is damaged, of poor quality or not fit for purpose) do they have to give you your money back.

    Shops will often tell you they will only give a refund on production of proof of purchase. Don’t be mislead into thinking this must be a till receipt. It can be a bank or credit card statement, although you may run into difficulties if it is for a different amount than that of the item you are trying to return.

    The shop doesn’t want to know – they say it’s the manufacturer’s responsibility

    The Sale of Goods Act makes reference to ‘the seller’, this is the shop, the retailer, or the individual you bought it from, and is who you made the contract with. It is not the manufacturer, and don’t let the shop tell you otherwise! If there is an obvious fault with the item at any time within the first 6 months and it has not been caused by wear and tear or misuse, your first port of call must be the shop you bought it from. They have the responsibility to put the matter right, and should not evade this responsibility by referring you to the manufacturer in the context of a guarantee or warranty. Even after this 6 month period, if the item breaks down prematurely , you should always go back to the shop or retailer in the first instance.

    Your statutory rights under the Sale of Goods Act take precedence over and above any warranty or guarantee you may have with either the retailer or manufacturer. It is misleading for a shop to tell you they can do nothing simply because their warranty or guarantee has run out, because you will still have your statutory rights. See our section on guarantees and extended warranties for more info.

    All this information is from this website.

    http://whatconsumer.co.uk/the-sale-of-goods-act/

    Trading Standards would also help with this.

    Mike / Speedbird
    Last edited by speedbird1960; 2011-12-17 at 23:00.

  7. #37
    Purser BillW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anmer View Post
    A new RadarBox comes with 12 months "free" subscription to the 5 minute delayed network. That means, if you are connected to the internet, you can "share" traffic with other RadarBox users. But the traffic displays a position 5 minutes earlier. It shows an "historic" location.

    After the free 12 months is up you can pay extra to continue using the service. This costs Euro 8 a month.

    Alternatively you can pay even more for "live" data (not delayed 5 minutes) and this costs Euro 15 a month. I suspect Akbar was offering you three months "free" subscription for the delayed network.

    One thing to bear in mind. The RadarBox default setting is set for your data to be sent to the AirNav server. If you change this preference, it reverts back everytime you start RadarBox.

    In essence, AirNav is selling your data without your permission as the majority of RadarBox users will be unaware of this default setting and that it resets itself the next time you launch the software. There has been much debate about this (at minimum) unethical practice and AirNav refuses to change the default setting to off and to retain the customer's preference. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to undertsand why as this is lucrative business for AirNav.

    Alternatively you can see live shared data for free on FR24 or for a one-off payment of Euro 25 by using PlanePlotter.

    Bottom line is you weren't being offered much and it doesn't cost AirNav anything in the first place.
    Good morning Anmar old mate, thank you for that. So if me or anyone else buys Airnav radarbox, takes it home, sets it up and just uses it, we STILL have to pay money on top of the purchase price or lose the service is that right ? In which case mate, it is a bigger rip off than first thought !!

    Bill

  8. #38
    Purser BillW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by speedbird1960 View Post
    This a poor state of affairs, and Bil should be entitled under UK law to his money back.

    This is some of the law regarding 'The Sale Of Goods Act' ( Sorry its a long post. )

    Sale of Goods Act

    The Sale of Goods Act 1979 is perhaps the most useful and relevant to the problems many consumers face when they make purchases on the High Street, online or by mail order. It is worth knowing about this piece of legislation, in terms of what rights you have and how you can resolve the situation, because not all shops can be relied on to act in an honourable or lawful way.

    The main focus of the Act is the provision of three statutory rights, although the act goes on to describe exactly what consumers are entitled to if any of these statutory rights are breached.

    There is some confusion about how the Sale of Goods Act applies to second-hand goods, items purchased on the internet or by mail order, items purchased via a doorstep sale, or anything bought from an online auction or marketplace. This following sections will cover all these situations, and hopefully give you a better understanding of how the law protects you and what you must watch out for.

    It is not fit for purpose

    Your Statutory Rights

    That’s a legitimate claim as long as you are using the item for the purpose for which it was intended. This is the principle of fitness for purpose. There is no point claiming that paint thinner has had adverse effects if it is not being used as paint thinner! Similarly, if you are commissioning the manufacture of a product and do not specify the purposes for which it will be used you will have no recourse if it fails to live up to your expectations.

    How do you measure quality?

    Satisfactory quality is defined as what a ‘reasonable person’ would regard as acceptable, and takes into account factors such as price paid, fitness for purpose specified, appearance and finish, freedom from minor blemishes, safety and durability. If it becomes apparent that an item is not of the quality you were led to expect, you were not aware of any such defect when you bought it, and you bought from a seller acting ‘in the course of a business’ (i.e. not an informal sale), you are quite within your rights to go back to the retailer, even after some months of use. If a product develops a fault within the first 6 months, the assumption will be that this defect was present at the time of purchase and you will not have to prove anything. If you are returning an item after this 6 month time period, this automatic assumption does not apply, and it may be up to you to prove the fault did not occur through misuse. You should also consider aspect of durability and acceptance.

    If it is the case that you were invited to carry out a thorough inspection of the product and fail to spot a defect which that inspection ought to have revealed, you may not have recourse. Safety is an important aspect of quality and we will look at unsafe goods and product liability under different legislation – namely that of the Consumer Protection Act

    Do shops have to give me my money back?

    When you buy something from a shop you are entering into a legally binding contract. Therefore they don’t have to give you a refund simply because you have changed your mind. Only if one of your statutory rights is breached (i.e. that the item is damaged, of poor quality or not fit for purpose) do they have to give you your money back.

    Shops will often tell you they will only give a refund on production of proof of purchase. Don’t be mislead into thinking this must be a till receipt. It can be a bank or credit card statement, although you may run into difficulties if it is for a different amount than that of the item you are trying to return.

    The shop doesn’t want to know – they say it’s the manufacturer’s responsibility

    The Sale of Goods Act makes reference to ‘the seller’, this is the shop, the retailer, or the individual you bought it from, and is who you made the contract with. It is not the manufacturer, and don’t let the shop tell you otherwise! If there is an obvious fault with the item at any time within the first 6 months and it has not been caused by wear and tear or misuse, your first port of call must be the shop you bought it from. They have the responsibility to put the matter right, and should not evade this responsibility by referring you to the manufacturer in the context of a guarantee or warranty. Even after this 6 month period, if the item breaks down prematurely , you should always go back to the shop or retailer in the first instance.

    Your statutory rights under the Sale of Goods Act take precedence over and above any warranty or guarantee you may have with either the retailer or manufacturer. It is misleading for a shop to tell you they can do nothing simply because their warranty or guarantee has run out, because you will still have your statutory rights. See our section on guarantees and extended warranties for more info.

    All this information is from this website.

    http://whatconsumer.co.uk/the-sale-of-goods-act/

    Trading Standards would also help with this.

    Mike / Speedbird
    Morning Mike, how are you old chum ? Well that post of yours is extremely interesting and well worth studying carefully.
    One problem is, as I have pointed out in a previous post, this problem with drivers and Windows 7 64bit is NOT made well known and it is not until you buy the Eqpt get it home and try to install it, that you find out about it. I mean I am thick , I admit that when it comes to technical matters, also I do not have a lot of patience I admit that too, but I bought, like a good many other people, Airnav Radarbox Pro in good faith, as an ordinary customer, expecting to go home and with a cup of tea and a packet of my favourite "Biccys" LOL, install it and use it...simple....that is how it SHOULD be, but because of the technical problem between the PC and the Radar box and the fact that as a genuine customer I was not told about it, THAT is wrong, someone somewhere should be taken to task over that part of it, as a customer I have the right to know any information that could cause the Eqpt not to work that is a known problem by the manufacturers and the retailer. But it is a case of "sod the customer", lets get his money first !!

    Bill

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