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difference between radarcape vs dvb-t stick

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  • difference between radarcape vs dvb-t stick

    Hello

    What is the difference between RADARCAPE ((free ADS-B equipment offer)) and DVB-T Stick ?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Radarcape is a full receiver that costs about 600 euros - best equipment on the market, but FR24 are very careful where they send them to ensure they will get good return on the cost of the item - is really for people who want to increase coverage in their locality but don't want the bother of building something

    The DVB dongle is like one of these http://www.ebay.com/itm/111245822189
    you would need to provide a computer with internet access (could be a Raspberry Pi [cheap to buy, cheap to run 24/7] or a windows PC), an antenna (self build) etc - more for people who like to tinker with stuff.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by peterhr View Post
      Radarcape is a full receiver that costs about 600 euros - best equipment on the market, but FR24 are very careful where they send them to ensure they will get good return on the cost of the item - is really for people who want to increase coverage in their locality but don't want the bother of building something

      The DVB dongle is like one of these http://www.ebay.com/itm/111245822189
      you would need to provide a computer with internet access (could be a Raspberry Pi [cheap to buy, cheap to run 24/7] or a windows PC), an antenna (self build) etc - more for people who like to tinker with stuff.
      Thanks peterhr,

      You can say that radarcape is a pre-configured "mini PC"? Ready to install and use and with DVB dongle I have to use a normal PC and setup it all on my own?

      Now I understand better. Thanks

      Comment


      • #4
        Radarcape is a box you connect to the antenna. Power & internet
        Not a PC at all, it has a receiver and Linux computer inside to perform a specific task (much like a modern TV does)

        Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          Thanks, I understand

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          • #6
            You can learn more about the Radarcape box on this wiki page. It's the best receiver to buy
            http://wiki.modesbeast.com/Radarcape:Contents
            Main page: http://www.modesbeast.com/radarcape.html

            Like the post says above, Once everything is hooked up, It will automatically start uploading to FR24 server with your received data.
            Brian

            www.RadarSpotters.eu
            [ Feeder Station List ][ Map ][ Latest Feeders Rank Stats ][ ImRadarFeeder.com Radar Feeders WorldWide Map ][ VRS Feeder List ] (NEW)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by SoCalBrian View Post
              You can learn more about the Radarcape box on this wiki page. It's the best receiver to buy
              http://wiki.modesbeast.com/Radarcape:Contents
              Main page: http://www.modesbeast.com/radarcape.html

              Like the post says above, Once everything is hooked up, It will automatically start uploading to FR24 server with your received data.
              Thanks SoCalBrian

              Comment


              • #8
                FYI the "DVB-T" designation stands for "Digital Video Broadcasting Terrestrial", or in other words, regular (not satellite) digital TV. You can buy an inexpensive DVB-T tuner, and with the right 3rd party software, turn it into a software defined radio that's able to receive ADS-B (and possibly aircraft transponder) signals and decode them in your computer. It's the least expensive way to get into ADS-B monitoring, and is potentially very powerful. OTOH it requires a high level of proficiency to get it working and configured, and isn't guaranteed by the manufacturer.

                Turnkey products such as the Radarcape are made specifically for ADS-B monitoring, and (should) come ready to go. And for that you pay a hefty premium. Another thing that the Radarcape can do is feed sites like Flightradar24 even when your computer is turned off. You'll still need a computer to display the information, of course, but the Radarcape doesn't rely on your computer, whereas DVB-T dongles can't do anything without a host computer running software for them.

                I hope that answers the question a little more.

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                • #9
                  Not so harde to configure a DVB-T dngle based reciever - See post 8 in forum
                  http://forum.flightradar24.com/threa...e-to-feed-FR24

                  This uses a Raspberry Pi cigarette pack sized computer to run the receiver - this is similar to to the sort of computer built into the Radarcape.
                  Last edited by peterhr; 2014-03-12, 15:12.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by peterhr View Post
                    Not so harde to configure a DVB-T dngle based reciever...
                    "Hard" is a relative thing. What might not be hard for you or I might be prohibitively difficult for people with little to no technical ability.

                    I'll grant you that it's really nice to be able to buy a SDR for $20 and a couple of free downloads.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Speed Daemon View Post
                      "Hard" is a relative thing. What might not be hard for you or I might be prohibitively difficult for people with little to no technical ability.

                      I'll grant you that it's really nice to be able to buy a SDR for $20 and a couple of free downloads.
                      That is why I wrote the guide, step by step how to do it - admitted it does require the person doing the job to know how to download Putty and how to plug the bits together - but this in no more difficult than it would be to erect the antenna and connect the radarcape equipment and to set up a facebook account.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by peterhr View Post
                        That is why I wrote the guide, step by step how to do it - admitted it does require the person doing the job to know how to download Putty and how to plug the bits together - but this in no more difficult than it would be to erect the antenna and connect the radarcape equipment and to set up a facebook account.
                        When the tech boom started, I got out of TV and into IT. After 15 years in that field, I noted that customer support is 10% technical and 90% psychological. It's not that it's all that hard (at least through our eyes), but some people just plain don't want to take that leap and try new things. It's like my mom and her computer -- it's not that she can't learn, it's more that her goal isn't necessarily to learn. People are funny that way.

                        Anyway, back to the context of the OP's questions, the thing that I think is important for current and future readers to know is that DVB-T products weren't made to be ADS-B receivers. Those who buy them shouldn't call the manufacturer for assistance if they have problems while hacking them. That's my main point.

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                        • #13
                          I found this old thread about my exact question but the core issue still remains unanswered.

                          What exactly is the specific advantage of a Radarcape vs. a Raspberry Pi (or similar) setup that warrants the massive difference in price? The Radarcape comes with a fancy outdoor antenna (about $80), but it's possible to attach the same antenna to the Raspberry Pi and it would still be a >$500 price difference.

                          I found that the Radarcape uses a BeagleBone as a base, but a BeagleBone is in the same price range as a Raspberry Pi, so this still doesn't explain the massive difference in price. What would the difference be between a personal Beaglebone board and a Radarcape (assuming the same antenna is used). Is it just the convenience and the nice, custom case?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BenB View Post
                            I found this old thread about my exact question but the core issue still remains unanswered.

                            What exactly is the specific advantage of a Radarcape vs. a Raspberry Pi (or similar) setup that warrants the massive difference in price? The Radarcape comes with a fancy outdoor antenna (about $80), but it's possible to attach the same antenna to the Raspberry Pi and it would still be a >$500 price difference.

                            I found that the Radarcape uses a BeagleBone as a base, but a BeagleBone is in the same price range as a Raspberry Pi, so this still doesn't explain the massive difference in price. What would the difference be between a personal Beaglebone board and a Radarcape (assuming the same antenna is used). Is it just the convenience and the nice, custom case?
                            There is a chip on the board, that runs custom software/firmware developed by Guenter especially to decode the signal to the proper formats on-chip

                            Vs 3 layers of software decoding processes on a Rpi to do similar. You can only imagine the speed indifference.

                            Speed and signal strength is therefore taken care of at RAM speed vs CPU cycles and software.
                            Posts not to be taken as official support representation - Just a helpful uploader who tinkers

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BenB View Post
                              I found this old thread about my exact question but the core issue still remains unanswered.

                              What exactly is the specific advantage of a Radarcape vs. a Raspberry Pi (or similar) setup that warrants the massive difference in price? The Radarcape comes with a fancy outdoor antenna (about $80), but it's possible to attach the same antenna to the Raspberry Pi and it would still be a >$500 price difference.

                              I found that the Radarcape uses a BeagleBone as a base, but a BeagleBone is in the same price range as a Raspberry Pi, so this still doesn't explain the massive difference in price. What would the difference be between a personal Beaglebone board and a Radarcape (assuming the same antenna is used). Is it just the convenience and the nice, custom case?
                              Get an Airspy (airspy.com) much better hardware, even better software.
                              Or go even cheaper and get an Airspy Mini. Which is as good as the same while using ADS-B.

                              To answer your question: It's pure marketing.
                              Airspy = Airspy + computer (RPI) + software.
                              Radacape = Connect and go (Especially the FR24 version.)

                              You can connect Virtual Radar Server or similar to both, that says the same.

                              I have both, FR24 aims for good coverage but not the max possible.
                              Airspy you can fine tune to the outer limit and go ADS-B DXing

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