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  • Originally posted by peterhr View Post
    A standard low end UPS has 4 main components
    * 12v batteries (car battery is an example) but typically it will be one or more 12v batteries in series, from 7Ah to maybe 17Ah)
    * a charging circuit for the battery stack
    * a regulating and monitoring circuit - watching the input power and doing spike supression
    * an inverter so should the mains power fail, the inverter will supply power using the power stored in the battery.

    In normal mode the charger just tops up the battery, and the load runs from the mains

    but if all you want is to run low voltage devices like a router and the receiver - do you really need to have an inverter to lift the supply to mains voltage, then a power brick to convert it back.

    All it needs is a the battery, a suitable charger, and some power regulators

    12v 7AH battery - apx 12 USD

    12v charger (ebay item 271501916473) 7 USD

    12v -> 6v regulator - Apx 11USD

    12v -> microusb regulator 4 USD (ebay 310847327341)

    a new ups will start at $100 or more.

    Just think outside the box.

    (oh, and the 12v battery could run off a solar charger)
    Peterhr,

    Well, i'm not disagreeing with you but in this part of the world, I could get a basic APC UPS for under USD50 retail.
    There might be some shipping cost involved in your above list? And not to mention there's no casing for it yet.
    This can be crucial if there's kids/animals/uneducated person around that might possibly short the battery terminals!

    There's also 2 years warranty on the UPS. (I've claimed a unit before and was replaced with a complete new unit)

    What one can do is just to wire the regulators off the battery that's inside the UPS.
    That way, the battery is always charge and if power goes out, the onboard inverter can power any devices requires mains voltage too.
    Modify in any way you want!
    Each person to their own ways and requirements!
    Whichever way that suits one.
    Last edited by who; 2014-07-02, 13:43.

    Comment


    • Suddenly there's a lot of new terms I haven't come across before... like sine wave inverter and 1000w reminds me of those Sony HiFi Stereos lol. Clearly I dont know much about power. Better do some reading via google.

      Originally posted by who View Post
      Peterhr,

      EDITED

      What one can do is just to wire the regulators off the battery that's inside the UPS.
      Just to make sure I get it right, so you mean open up the UPS, then wire the 5V regulator to the battery terminal? To power like a Rpi or router? correct? So that frees up the socket at the UPS for something else?

      Comment


      • Inverter is to convert from DC to AC. Cheaper UPS outputs a modified since wave. These type of since wave might not work properly with motors and some appliances.

        square_modified_sinewave.jpg

        A true sine wave inverter outputs a 'proper' sine wave.

        For example, http://www.apc.com/products/resource...otal_watts=200
        Look under waveform type, it tells you what type it is.

        This is only if you need AC mains voltages from your battery. If DC is all you need, don't worry about it.
        You should be able to connect a DC regulator to the battery terminals.
        But one thing i've not managed to find out myself is how good/bad is the voltage/waveform from the charging circuitry from the UPS charger.
        I presume most regulators should be able to handle it since any voltage spikes present should be 'absorbed' by the battery.
        Have one regulator connected to check, while bringing the UPS on and off, with and without input power.
        Better still if you have a scope to look at it. I reckon it should be safe but please practice common sense.

        If you are not familiar with mains power voltages, please do not attempt this as it involves opening up of the UPS.
        Since the UPS can be energized (inverter powered up and outputting mains voltages) even if you have pulled out the incoming mains.
        So please check and double check before touching or connecting anything inside the UPS.

        So with battery powered, your feeder (and network) should be able to remain online even with power outages (trying to make sure we're still not off topic! )
        Last edited by who; 2014-07-02, 14:25.

        Comment


        • could not agree more. preferably work on DC12v. it is safe and power quality is assured.

          you can buy all sort of cheap DC to DC converter on the net to suit your requirement.

          i have a 5 Volts, 9 Volts and direct 12 Volts rail from my solar systems. the inverter is to power up ceiling fan, the PC/monitor/printer and note book. other than these, all are on 12V DC including my lighting in the room.

          yes, the solar ensure my feeds is on 24/7 but i had 2 lightings strike in May that zapped out my modem, PC power supply and an expensive graphic card too. i will leave it to another day to deal with this then.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by startomatic View Post
            could not agree more. preferably work on DC12v. it is safe and power quality is assured.

            you can buy all sort of cheap DC to DC converter on the net to suit your requirement.
            Yup!

            i have a 5 Volts, 9 Volts and direct 12 Volts rail from my solar systems. the inverter is to power up ceiling fan, the PC/monitor/printer and note book. other than these, all are on 12V DC including my lighting in the room.

            yes, the solar ensure my feeds is on 24/7 but i had 2 lightings strike in May that zapped out my modem, PC power supply and an expensive graphic card too. i will leave it to another day to deal with this then.
            Quick question, judging from your descriptions, you seem to be perhaps running a gaming desktop? (requiring expensive graphic card).
            In that case you'll need lots of power for that. Else, there are 12V input PSU for the desktop. But these usually don't handle high power requirements of a gaming desktop.

            Since you mention all your devices are powered by the batteries, your lightning strike came via the phone?
            Did you have any protection for it? I recommend the local brand Cal-lab, http://www.cal-lab.com/
            I admit their webpage is quite difficult to look for their product range!

            I am also looking for protection for the outdoor antenna.
            The bottom 2 diagrams appear to suit me at the moment.
            http://cal-lab.com/index.php?act=highly-exposed-set-ups
            Last edited by who; 2014-07-03, 13:47.

            Comment


            • mine was a 3D graphic card for Autocad work. after the lighting strike, i get a blue hue on the monitor display. my pc use a 850W power supply and my inverter is rated at 1000W so no problem.

              lighting came in from the DC bus. i can see the DC components on the modem pc board fried. so i installed a blade switch that isolate my DC supplies.

              the second time, it came in via the phone line. only the modem is konged.

              i have a N connector lightning protector for my 19dBi 2.4G omni antenna feed. this bugger is about 2.4m in length

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              • i notice a marked increase in my coverage after switching my ADSL modem. strange that the ADSL does affect the range.

                Screenshot 2014-07-06 20.01.42.jpg

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                • Originally posted by startomatic View Post
                  i notice a marked increase in my coverage after switching my ADSL modem. strange that the ADSL does affect the range.

                  [ATTACH=CONFIG]4354[/ATTACH]
                  How close is the receiver to the ADSL modem? One of the user, Jarod, reported that if the receiver and modem are next to each other (or on top) it affects the GPS timing. So maybe its because of GPS was affected so your range wasn't good.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by North Borneo Radar View Post
                    How close is the receiver to the ADSL modem? One of the user, Jarod, reported that if the receiver and modem are next to each other (or on top) it affects the GPS timing. So maybe its because of GPS was affected so your range wasn't good.
                    i mount everything together. the ADSL next to my NAS then the receiver. no changes.

                    if that the case, i may try to install it in the attic using a POE supplies. will report back

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by startomatic View Post
                      i mount everything together. the ADSL next to my NAS then the receiver. no changes.

                      if that the case, i may try to install it in the attic using a POE supplies. will report back
                      Perhaps leave the set up as it is and get a bit more data from the stats page after a few days to determine whether your range has increased?

                      My FR24 receiver is about 45cm away from the adsl modem, and my mode s beast receiver is 25cm away from the modem. No effect to my range however. Weather does though, for the extremities.

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                      • Originally posted by startomatic View Post
                        i notice a marked increase in my coverage after switching my ADSL modem. strange that the ADSL does affect the range.

                        [ATTACH=CONFIG]4354[/ATTACH]
                        This means your ASDL modem is not well shielded and emits RF noise, creating interference to your receiver.
                        Put your receiver into a conductive cage, ground it, to obtain a noise 'free' environment for it.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by who View Post
                          This means your ASDL modem is not well shielded and emits RF noise, creating interference to your receiver.
                          Put your receiver into a conductive cage, ground it, to obtain a noise 'free' environment for it.
                          That would be an interesting experiment to do also hehe

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                          • yup...had decided to put it in the attic by POE. this would do away with the long antenna cable to reduce signal losses.

                            beside i have 2 extra network port on my RB 443 in the attic so this should come in very handy.

                            getting more interesting by the day.......

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                            • Originally posted by North Borneo Radar View Post
                              That would be an interesting experiment to do also hehe
                              Biscuit tin?

                              Originally posted by startomatic View Post
                              yup...had decided to put it in the attic by POE. this would do away with the long antenna cable to reduce signal losses.

                              beside i have 2 extra network port on my RB 443 in the attic so this should come in very handy.

                              getting more interesting by the day.......
                              As long as it does't get cooked up there...

                              Comment


                              • this is how my RB433 look like. it was mounted on a self make half enclosure. i will do the same for the FR24 receiver. the advantage as i mentioned is to cut short my antenna feed cable at the attic. the half open enclosure ensure adequate cooling too and save another messy network cable by plugging the receiver into the RB.

                                P1060136.jpg

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