Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Malaysia Airlines Flight Goes Missing En Route to China - Flight MH370

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • iazoniccc
    replied
    US Navy Boeing P-8A Poseidon, RSCU74, heading out to the search zone.

    Leave a comment:


  • speedbird1960
    replied
    Latest update from Aviation Herald.

    "In the evening of Mar 29th 2014 AMSA reported that the aircraft have sighted new objects in Saturday's 252,000 square kilometer/73,400 square nautical miles search area. The Chinese ship as well as HMAS Success already operating in the new search area have recovered a number of objects, however, none of them could be confirmed to be related to MH-370."

    http://avherald.com/h?article=4710c69b&opt=0

    Leave a comment:


  • Sea Petal
    replied
    Originally posted by POR911 View Post
    When the airline was first informed of the issue, maybe the confusion between the airline, government, military, airforce and Navy...some one in the airline's technical area should have realised while they had not subscribed to Boeing/ Inmarsat, BUT make an immediate urgent request for the 'ping' handshake to be accepted and maybe then the aircraft could then download the data it was trying to.
    All of the data from the engines and the entire plane goes to the manufactures, i.e. Rolls Royce and Boeing all of the time the whole set of data is collected it is never just partial. The data is vital to the manufacturers for the research of their products. Boeing has data packages they sell to the airline for maintenance scheduling. The manufacturers would have immediate access to their data and they would give it to the authorities.

    From what I am reading that system was turned off or damaged and no data was being sent. The only data they seem to have is just the handshake ping. The satellite software system asking for data and not getting it back. Apparently Inmarsat did tests with flights in the area to see how the data would read. I wonder if that was on a plane that had ACARS turned on or off for the ping tests? The one thing I find odd is the "partial" ping. What are the odds that the satellite data handshake sweep actually reads the ping at the exact moment the signal stops?

    Also, Boeing would have the schematics and know exactly where every single thing on that plane is. If all the "boards" were very close together it is possible a fire could have taken out all the communications systems at once. Boeing knows if that is possible they would have been looking at exactly that possibility. For safety that is something they deliberately try not to do... have every single communication system right next to one another. If at all possible one of the systems would be kept apart from the other.
    Last edited by Sea Petal; 2014-03-29, 12:51.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mac Attack
    replied
    Any news on when they are going to start using the TPL?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike
    replied
    Thread cleared and user Voyager10 banned for 7 days.

    Once again we keep away from speculations and conspiracy theories. Also please don't post whole articles. Quote some part and include a link to the article.

    Leave a comment:


  • JinbaIttai
    replied
    My receiver just picked up a Malaysian aircraft (mode-S only) with hexcode 7500d2 which Google tells me is a C-130 Hercules.
    Callsign is "ALLIED 1"
    It was at FL190 and is right now descending through FL140 so I presume it is returning to RAAF Pearce from the search area.
    Waiting impatiently for MLAT to come to Perth..

    edited to add: It was joined moments later by 7500d4, another Malaysian C-130
    Last edited by JinbaIttai; 2014-03-29, 03:41.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sea Petal
    replied
    According to Malaysian Airlines website their 777-200's in business class (35 seats) have satellite telephones. Has anyone ever used one of these? I wonder if any calls even before MH370 disappeared were made. Can this system also be turned off by the pilot from the cockpit?

    http://www.malaysiaairlines.com/hq/e...g-777-200.html

    Leave a comment:


  • iazoniccc
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike View Post
    Kyung Lah in the CNN video made an interview with me on Skype 2 or 3 days after the crash. I think it was transmitted on CNN Domestic (USA).
    I was reading the transcript earlier on CNN, didn't even realise that was you Mike!

    KYUNG LAH, CNN NATIONAL CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): A clear early Saturday morning in Kuala Lumpur; 12:41 a.m., Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 takes off to Beijing.

    MIKAEL ROBERTSSON, FLIGHTRADAR24: It was a normal departure.

    LAH: Flightradar24 is watching. The app tracks planes around the world. The Boeing 777's transponder appears to be working normally. But then, about 45 minutes into the flight, the plane slows slightly and then turns from 25 to 40 degrees. Seconds later, it simply vanishes off radar.

    (on camera): What do you mean by just disappeared?

    ROBERTSSON: Suddenly, we stopped to receive signals from this transponder. This is something amazing. I have never seen anything like this before.

    LAH: What it is like for you in this part of the world to suddenly see a plane disappear?

    ROBERTSSON: It really looked suspect and -- yes, not good.

    LAH (voice-over): How do you find a plane that has vanished? If Flight 370 is the needle, this is the haystack. Three dozen aircraft and 40 ships from 10 countries comb three Southeast Asian seas, and, still, three days in, not a single sign of the plane, the 227 passengers and 12 crew.
    http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIP...10/tdl.01.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike
    replied
    Originally posted by voyager10
    2.
    here is new link, same video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3cDWNXiEUI
    Kyung Lah in the CNN video made an interview with me on Skype 2 or 3 days after the crash. I think it was transmitted on CNN Domestic (USA).

    Leave a comment:


  • voyager10
    replied
    Social News Photos,....


    .

    Leave a comment:


  • voyager10
    replied
    MH370 PRESS BRIEFING BY HISHAMMUDDIN HUSSEIN,

    MINISTER OF DEFENCE AND ACTING MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

    28 MARCH 2014, 5:30PM

    Introductory statement

    Today, the search for MH370 has been further refined. The international investigation team continue working to narrow the search area, and shed further light on MH370’s flight path.
    ...
    We are, as always, grateful for the continuing co-operation of our partners in this difficult and intensive search.
    Whilst search operations are on-going, we continue to focus our efforts on caring for the families. In Cabinet this morning, we discussed the importance of continuing to support the relatives of the passengers and crew.

    Refined search area

    On Monday, the Prime Minister announced that based on new data analysis, Inmarsat and the AAIB had concluded that MH370 flew along the southern corridor, and that its last position was in the middle of the Indian Ocean, west of Perth.

    On Tuesday, I confirmed that further study of this data would be undertaken to attempt to determine the final position of the aircraft. The Malaysian investigation team set up an international working group, comprising agencies with expertise in satellite communications and aircraft performance, to take this work forward.

    The international working group included representatives from the UK, namely Inmarsat, AAIB, and Rolls Royce; from China, namely the CAAC and AAID; from the US, namely the NTSB, FAA, and Boeing; as well as the relevant Malaysian authorities.

    The group has been working to refine the Inmarsat data, and to analyse it – together with other information, including radar data and aircraft performance assumptions – to narrow the search area.

    Information which had already been examined by the investigation was re-examined in light of new evidence drawn from the Inmarsat data analysis.

    In addition, international partners – who continue to process data in their home countries, as well as in the international working group – have further refined existing data. They have also come up with new technical information, for example on aircraft performance.

    Yesterday, this process yielded new results, which indicated that MH370 flew at a higher speed than previously thought, which in turn means it used more fuel and could not travel as far. This information was passed to RCC Australia by the NTSB, to help further refine and narrow the search area.

    The Australian authorities have indicated that they have shifted the search area approximately 1,100 kilometres to the north east. Because of ocean drift, this new search area could still be consistent with the potential objects identified by various satellite images over the past week.

    This work is on-going, and we can expect further refinements. As the Australian authorities indicated this morning, this is standard practice in a search operation. It is a process of continually refining data which in turn further narrows the search area. With each step, we get closer to understanding MH370’s flight path.

    Searches must be conducted on the best information available at the time. In the search for MH370, we have consistently followed the evidence, and acted on credible leads. Our search and rescue efforts have been directed by verified and corroborated information. This latest refinement of the search area is no different.

    Satellite images

    Last night, Japanese authorities announced they had satellite images which showed a number of floating objects approximately 2,500 kilometres southwest of Perth. Early this morning we received separate satellite imagery from the Thai authorities which also showed potential objects.

    These new satellite images join those released by Australia, China, France, and Malaysia, all of which are with RCC Australia. The range of potential objects, and the difficulty in re-identifying them shows just how complex this investigation is. We remain grateful to all our partners for continuing to assist in the search operations.

    Concluding remarks.

    The new search area, approximately 1,680 kilometres west of Perth, remains in the Australian area of responsibility.
    Australia continues to lead the search efforts in this new area, and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority gave a comprehensive operational update earlier today. As more information emerges, they will be issuing frequent operational updates, including on assets deployed.

    I would like to echo their statements that the new search area, although more focused than before, remains considerable; and that the search conditions, although easier than before, remain challenging.

    For the families of those on board, we pray that further processing of data, and further progress in the search itself, brings us closer to finding MH370.

    ENDS

    Leave a comment:


  • iazoniccc
    replied
    Picture: suspicious object spotted by New Zealand military plane on Friday.

    Top picture is provided by Chinese state broadcaster CCTV, bottom picture courtesy of The Times, which had a reporter on board the search flight.

    Bj0MJgzCEAAEv2L.png
    Bj0Xmk2CcAA-t3v.jpg

    Australian Air Force preparing to send a helicopter out to the revised search area tomorrow to locate and collect the objects.
    Last edited by iazoniccc; 2014-03-28, 15:11.

    Leave a comment:


  • fungus
    replied
    Just a real quick report re the new search area for MH370 to the north east of original search area off west coast of Australia;

    Latest AMSA briefing (No25) (time expressed in 12hr clock mode rather than 24hr for reasons unknown (should read 23:15Hrs) 28th March;

    https://www.amsa.gov.au/media/docume...a_Update25.pdf

    Also a recent media report from 19:25Hrs 28th March;

    http://au.news.yahoo.com/world/a/221...ane-to-resume/

    It's just ticked over 24:00Hrs here in Sydney, Australia (13:00UTC).

    Regards,
    Gregg

    Looks as if I was too slow off the mark to hit the post button, thankyou Iazoniccc

    Hopefully tomorrows expected weather will enable good search conditions and lead to something of help in this quest.
    G'nite all.
    Last edited by fungus; 2014-03-28, 13:28.

    Leave a comment:


  • iazoniccc
    replied
    28th March, 2014: 1115(AEDT)
    Search operation for Malaysia Airlines aircraft: Update 25

    Five aircraft spotted multiple objects of various colours during Friday’s search for the missing Malaysian
    Airlines flight MH370.

    Search activities have now concluded. A total of 256,000 square kilometres was searched.

    Photographic imagery of the objects was captured and will be assessed overnight.

    The objects cannot be verified or discounted as being from MH370 until they are relocated and
    recovered by ships.

    A Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) P3 Orion reported sighting a number of objects white or light in
    colour and a fishing buoy.

    A Royal Australian Air Force P3 Orion relocated the objects detected by the RNZAF Orion and reported
    it had seen two blue/grey rectangular objects floating in the ocean.

    A second RAAF P3 Orion spotted various objects of various colours in a separate part of the search area
    about 546 kilometres away.

    A total of ten planes were tasked by AMSA in today’s search and all have now departed the search area.

    AMSA has tasked Chinese Maritime Administration patrol ship, Haixun 01, which is in the search area
    and will be in a position to relocate the objects on Saturday.

    Friday’s search area was shifted north after international air crash investigators in Malaysia provided the
    latest credible lead available to AMSA.

    This was on the advice of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB).

    Weather conditions in the area are expected to be reasonable for searching on Saturday.

    Leave a comment:


  • POR911
    replied
    When the airline was first informed of the issue, maybe the confusion between the airline, government, military, airforce and Navy...some one in the airline's technical area should have realised while they had not subscribed to Boeing/ Inmarsat, BUT make an immediate urgent request for the 'ping' handshake to be accepted and maybe then the aircraft could then download the data it was trying to.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X