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Malaysia Airlines Flight Goes Missing En Route to China - Flight MH370

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  • Originally posted by putnik View Post
    Here is a good simple explanation of the aircraft systems and these "pings":

    http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/s...ngs-tim-farrar
    Thank you. Very nice link. Key point 6 explains how the search area was calculated. I would hope that this is based on all of the pings received.

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    • Untitled.jpg
      Missing MH370: Maldives residents report 'low-flying jumbo jet' sighting on March 8


      http://www.haveeru.com.mv/news/54062
      Last edited by bhavlobhuro; 2014-03-18, 16:14.

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      • Is it possible for MH370 to have linked up with another civilian flight with a transponder on to fly undetected on ATC screens? Looking at the playback from that night (start at 17:00 UTC March 7) I have identified Malaysian 30 (MH30) as a candidate and a web blogger with the same idea identified Singapore 68. From what I gather the proximity warnings are keyed off transponders working so neither plane would set off alarms. As well, for MH30 the flight plan could be shared with the MH370 pilot well in advance to program it in at a slightly lower altitude (or in fact program in a whole rendezvous as well). And of course, MH370 would be able to listen to ATC comms to follow any required course changes. Is it even possible to mask yourself this way?

        MH30 flies DIRECTLY through the entirety of Iran and it would be reached approximately 7.25 hours from deptature of MH370 (12:00am March 8 UTC). SIA68 would get to Turkmenistan in approximately the same timeframe.

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        • Originally posted by iazoniccc View Post
          There is no way anyone can say that with any degree of certainty whatsoever given the fact that the last known satellite correspondence (or ping) was one hour after the aircraft's endurance expiry. That is to say that the fuel that MH370 was given before it departed KL had ran out, yet 60 minutes later it was clearly still powered up, ready, able and willing to provide satellite communication. This can certainly NOT be demonstrated from an aircraft at the bottom of the ocean.
          Is that endurance a result of your own calculations?

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          • Originally posted by Oblivian View Post
            Sure..
            It was on day 1 or 2 of the start. And as many of us have pointed out it's a case of don't beleive what you read, or continue to pass the information on until verified

            It appears their source was twitter, and that chinese media jumped on it and falsely reported without actually looking into it.

            http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/...0M50B120140308


            http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/...0M50B120140308
            Many thanx! It all is just so UN-BE-LIEV-AB-LE!

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Exadios View Post
              Is that endurance a result of your own calculations?
              Admittedly not, I'm just going on what is considered to be "normal practice" in relation to this particular aircraft and the length of its journey. If the investigative team or Malaysia Airlines themselves noticed the captain had requested tanks full for a flight of this length it should be a massive red flag. No doubt that would have been made public by now.

              It is surely fair to say that, at this moment in time, given the absolute facts, there is no more evidence that the passengers are dead than that they are alive. To suggest they are alive would be hazardous for so many reasons, but given the cold hard facts, there is simply no evidence to the contrary either.

              Is the mortality state of the 239 SOB a result of your own calculations?
              Last edited by iazoniccc; 2014-03-18, 15:09.

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              • Originally posted by iazoniccc View Post
                There is no way anyone can say that with any degree of certainty whatsoever given the fact that the last known satellite correspondence (or ping) was one hour after the aircraft's endurance expiry. That is to say that the fuel that MH370 was given before it departed KL had ran out, yet 60 minutes later it was clearly still powered up, ready, able and willing to provide satellite communication. This can certainly NOT be demonstrated from an aircraft at the bottom of the ocean.
                That's the best prima facie evidence that we have right now that the aircraft must have landed somewhere. (Let that sink in.)

                According to one report, the flight was given a standard 30 minutes of extra fuel beyond what it needed to get to Beijing. I would presume that the people who calculated the first series of circles overlaying maps of the globe used a standard calculation even before the Malaysian government got around to confirming it. Since there's nothing that can be done to increase the maximum possible range, that leaves only the probability that the plane landed safely enough to turn on the APU to power the avionics bay for at least an hour.

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                • Originally posted by Exadios View Post
                  The NTSB is now in Malaysia.
                  And the Malaysian government is not cooperating with the NTSB people.

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                  • Originally posted by MartH View Post
                    Highly unlikely. Snopes is your friend: http://www.snopes.com/politics/consp...ysiapatent.asp
                    +1

                    Saying things like "spread this information everywhere" is tantamount to an admission of lying.

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                    • Originally posted by putnik View Post
                      Here is a good simple explanation of the aircraft systems and these "pings":

                      http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/s...ngs-tim-farrar
                      Looks like a good "for dummies" reference.

                      Note that there's no need to enclose the word ping in quotes; the name of the utility is literally ping. Anyone doing computer networking has used it many times.

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                      • Originally posted by Exadios View Post
                        Unfortunately, the climb to 45,0000 feet has, like the plane itself, disappeared with trace. It s current location is unknown. It has been replaced with a FMS managed turn which, for reasons unknown, indicates foul play.
                        Yet another case of the Malaysian government contradicting itself, and using innuendo in place of facts.

                        Without actual physical evidence or other evidence from other sources, the value of what the Malaysian government is saying drops every day. This is one "fact" that can only be gotten from the possession of the airframe itself. Even then it's a mighty big leap of faith.

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                        • Originally posted by Speed Daemon View Post
                          And the Malaysian government is not cooperating with the NTSB people.
                          Yes, that's bad news. Plainly the NTSB are collecting a lot of their out data independent of the Malaysians.

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                          • The Thai air force is now saying they tracked a plane after MH370 disappeared, but it wasn't judged a threat to Thai security as it was in Malaysian airspace.

                            http://avherald.com/h?article=4710c69b&opt=0

                            A newspaper report also claims Thai air force only just handed over the radar information because Malaysia hadn't specifically asked them for it.

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                            • Originally posted by Exadios View Post
                              Yes, that's bad news. Plainly the NTSB are collecting a lot of their out data independent of the Malaysians.
                              Good point. With the Malaysian government playing politics there, the best thing that the NTSC team can do is to keep their heads down and investigate the things that they can see firsthand. For instance there are news reports of plane sightings -- the NTSB team can go and interview the people themselves, using their own proven methods.

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                              • Originally posted by Speed Daemon View Post
                                That's the best prima facie evidence that we have right now that the aircraft must have landed somewhere. (Let that sink in.)

                                According to one report, the flight was given a standard 30 minutes of extra fuel beyond what it needed to get to Beijing. I would presume that the people who calculated the first series of circles overlaying maps of the globe used a standard calculation even before the Malaysian government got around to confirming it. Since there's nothing that can be done to increase the maximum possible range, that leaves only the probability that the plane landed safely enough to turn on the APU to power the avionics bay for at least an hour.
                                I don't wish to speculate too much but the ping's being relayed for such as time after lost contact and flightpath deviation does give weight to some of the more outlandish theories.

                                For one we can almost surely say that a catastrophic failure did not occur. The aircraft could not have remained airborne for so long, neither can it stay afloat for so long as to communicate effectively with satellites.

                                Pilot suicide to me personally appears far-fetched in that all that was required was a trip to the WC by the unknowing party while the other disengages the auto pilot, maximum thrust and nose down into the dark abyss of the South China Sea. Highly unlikely that he was so suicidal that he wanted to die and take 200+ innocent passengers with him, not right now, but many hours later. No doubt allowing time for everyone else on board, including the other pilot to overcome him and take back control.

                                Almost like something out of a soap opera, but not so much a "whodunnit?" as a "whodunwhat?". Without pushing tin, there's a few countries in and around the northern search corridor I wouldn't trust with a plastic spoon.
                                Last edited by iazoniccc; 2014-03-18, 16:07. Reason: spelling error

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