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Malaysia Airlines Flight Goes Missing En Route to China - Flight MH370

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  • Originally posted by Hege View Post
    I have been using FR24 every time one in my family or friends are flying, so I have been using it alot. But I have never seen this red stripe on the map before, on the spot everyone say the MH370 is missing. After the red stripe, the missing plane are coming back on my computer, and fly a long distance before stopping and not showing. Is it just me seeing this?? Every time I have playedback this flight, the plain is not gone before this spot. Is it possible that the plain is there?? [ATTACH=CONFIG]3550[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]3551[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]3552[/ATTACH]
    This has already been discussed.

    Look at the plane's registration 9MMRQ on your screen grabs. I think you will find this was the following days' flight...the relevant one had registration code 9MMRO.

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    • Originally posted by Hege View Post
      I have been using FR24 every time one in my family or friends are flying, so I have been using it alot. But I have never seen this red stripe on the map before, on the spot everyone say the MH370 is missing. After the red stripe, the missing plane are coming back on my computer, and fly a long distance before stopping and not showing. Is it just me seeing this?? Every time I have playedback this flight, the plain is not gone before this spot. Is it possible that the plain is there?? [ATTACH=CONFIG]3550[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]3551[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]3552[/ATTACH]
      They are not images of the plane that is missing!!!
      The registration of the missing plane is 9M-MRO not MRQ.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by iazoniccc View Post
        Apologies, I stand corrected. Thought modern CVR were 2 hours minimum.
        You both had me wondering about this. It seems that the old ones used to only record 30 mins until previous investigations found that the key part of the recording would have happened before the last 30 mins. They apparently as standard record 2 hours now. If the theory is true that it flew on 4-5 hours more, we'll never know what happened at the most significant moments. On the plus side it seems the FDR can record approximately 17-25 hours.

        I'm also on the fence about the whole mobile phone thing. I've had plenty experience with not getting a mobile signal on land, never mind in the air. I also forgot that my phone was on when I was flying across mainland Europe once, I only realised when I heard my phone receiving a text, it was a roaming text from my network, welcoming me to the country. This was only as we landed and I had not got a single message from any of the other countries/networks I flew over.

        On a side note, we've been somewhat educated for many years that mobile phones should not be turned on inside a plane. If the plane I was on was having issues, I certainly would not dream of turning on my phone in the off chance it could give problems to the plane & crew that are trying to save us.
        If it was a hijacking then sure, I would probably think F it, we're probably screwed anyway...I just would have assumed a hijacker would take these from people pretty quickly.

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        • http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/15/wo...r.html?hp&_r=0

          Interesting if true?

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          • Airborne Cell Phone Performance

            "They found limited communications above 2,000 feet AGL (above ground level) and essentially no communications at 8000 feet AGL and above. The planes used in these tests had cruising speeds of 138 and 127 knots."

            http://www.datasync.com/~rsf1/cell-air.htm
            AMS Daily Fight Information: http://schiphol.dutchplanespotters.nl/

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            • What do I do wrong then? Starts playedback, set: 8 march 2014, start 17:00 oclock. ( Norwegian time )
              Ahha..... When I tried the same 7 march, i understood. Norway and Malaysia has not the same timezone..

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              • Originally posted by Hege View Post
                What do I do wrong then? Starts playedback, set: 8 march 2014, start 17:00 oclock. ( Norwegian time )
                Ahha..... When I tried the same 7 march, i understood. Norway and Malaysia has not the same timezone..
                FlightRadar is using UTC - Universal Time, so even though it departed on the 8th of March local time it was still 7th March UTC

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                • Originally posted by Hege View Post
                  What do I do wrong then? Starts playedback, set: 8 march 2014, start 17:00 oclock. ( Norwegian time )
                  Ahha..... When I tried the same 7 march, i understood. Norway and Malaysia has not the same timezone..
                  Afgang tid var 08/03 - KL.00:41 i Kuala Lumpur som svarer til 07/03 - Kl.16.41 GMT/UTC (ligesom flightradar24) og 07/03 - Kl.17.41 I Norge.

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                  • I have a question,if I may! i am looking at flight radar at the moment, and just saw cnn report, that the plane probably crashed in the indian ocean ( high classified report)!
                    Now why is there so little traffic in the bay of bengal and the anderman sea????

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                    • NEW THEORY THAT CORRESPONDS WITH FACTS:

                      FACTS SO FAR:

                      1. At around 1:20 AM local time, MH370 disappears from radar, while making a course change in order to follow M765 airway (http://skyvector.com). This was part of the planned flight route. Flightradar 24
                      The heading of the plane was about 40 degrees.

                      Dia1.jpg

                      2. CNN reports that MH370 climbed from 35.000 feet to 45.000 feet, well above it maximum altitude (43.100 feet, according to Boeing). After this, the plane descended to 23.000 feet.
                      Quote: "Malaysian military radar showed the plane climbing to 45,000 feet soon after disappearing from civilian radar screens and then dropping to 23,000 feet before climbing again, the official said" (CNN)

                      3. A New Zealand oil rig worker at Songa Mercur oil rig spots an burning airplane in the sky and reports this, then after a while the plane stopped burning. Moreover, the worker didn't report that the plane was actually falling from the sky.The Wire - Oil rig worker story. I verified the coordinates of the oil rig, and it is definitely possible that this worker saw the plane. With a formula, you can calculate the maximum distance to horizon: Formula. Using a altitude of 35.000 feet (h= 10 668 meters), the maximum distance to horizon is 369 km. Using the longitude and latitude of the last known location of MH370 and the oil rig, I estimated the distance to be 551 km, which is too far for the plane to be seen from the oil rig. However, the plane was heading towards the oil rig. After MH370 disappeared, the plane climbed to 45.000, which takes some time and MH370 should have moved closer to the oil rig, such it became visible to the oil rig.
                      overview.jpg
                      THEORY:

                      After MH370 disappeared from radar, it kept on flying heading 40 degrees. Something (I have no clue) must have caused the plane to climb until 45.000 feet. At that point, the engines don't get enough oxygen and flame out, which seems like the plane is burning. A flame out occurs when the fuel/air mixture is wrong (Wikipedia Flame out)After that, the plane descended until 23.000 feet, an altitude at which the engines get enough oxygen and the flames go out. This explains why the oil rig worker saw a "burning plane" and then disappear What happened after this is still a puzzle, possibly MH370 turned to the Indian Ocean...
                      Last edited by eisenhower; 2014-03-15, 02:02.

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                      • If the U.S. has said that one of their satellites continued to receive pings from this plane for around
                        4 hours, then it must be a fact. Correct me if I am wrong, but these "pings" must have headers on each data
                        packet they are transmitting. How else would they be able to identify this plane from the hundreds of others.
                        They also must have logging of all transmissions, so I would think proving it would be a simple matter.
                        Therefore there should be no question of the validity of that claim. If it did fly to the Indian Ocean, it must have
                        flown over land. I want to know why it wasn't tracked on radar then. Is it possible that it was flying too low
                        to be picked up by radar. Or is this just a myth? If it was flying too low, and near land, I would think that someone would have gotten a message through on their mobile. Do the stewards have any sort of phone/communications system independent of the cockpit that
                        they could have used? Look at the terrain on this track. Looks pretty green. Is it possible they could have crashed on land and no-one notice.
                        If this theory about flying to the Indian Ocean is true, I find it very disturbing that in todays day and age a plane of that size can make
                        such a deviation without anyone being alerted. I think in the very near future, all planes will be transmitting their GPS co-ordinates independent of any cockpit intervention. If it is found on this track. I would agree with the ghost plane theory. I just hope and pray that it was very sudden and the
                        passengers and crew were unconscious and didn't have to suffer.

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                        • Hello,

                          From what I have since read on this forum in regard to my earlier 1st post (#314).

                          It looks like both aircraft MH370 and the later one I looked at, AXM1656 both made a turn to the right at or shortly after a Way Point . A normal event, am I correct in thinking this ?

                          "In the event of the oxygen failure discussed in an earlier post, if the cockpit crew were the only ones effected, would the cabin staff or even passengers have been aware that the aircraft was not on the route it should have been on ?". - This has been answered in that it was at night so, most probably they would not have noticed a change.

                          "when 9/11 was in the news, Dozens of "last" phone calls were reported made from passengers to their relations.
                          In this event there seems to have been none ?" - This has been answered - Reasons expressed were because of aircraft's height, speed and being over the ocean.

                          "In the event that it made landfall then is it possible these days that it could remain undiscovered in forest/jungle ?" - This has been answered in that there is nowhere in the region that the aircraft is now assumed to be that has a long enough runway for a normal landing and in the event of a crash landing as signals have been reported then the aircraft must still be intact, this would not be the case it seems in the event of a crash landing.

                          With regard to the five passengers who did not fly but left their luggage on board - This has been answered -as the a/c was not destroyed in an explosion but is known to have flown for hours then they would seem to be in the clear.

                          Military Exercises - This has been answered - a/c had not been targeted or struck by any missile as it continued to fly.

                          Thanks,
                          Alex

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                          • Also, it must be noted that there was no moon that day. Moon set at 00:40 hrs. Thus, total darkness. IF this was an unfortunate, deliberate act, this could be a factor to consider, for the timing of the same.

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                            • The Andaman Islands : There are 572 islands in the territory, only three dozen of which are inhabited.

                              My God. Not only do they need to search the ocean, but how hard is it to find a crashed plane
                              in the thick jungle. I don't think people realize how difficult this search really is.
                              I've always wondered why they don't put a GPS transmitter in the "Black Box"

                              Comment


                              • Hello,

                                Did I read in a post that there was a meteor or Comet come down in the region at the time of the radar loss of MH370 ?
                                It may be that the aircraft climbed to the 45000 to avoid it (?), followed by "Flame out", resulting in falling to 23000 and then did it return to 35000 ?
                                This action of the climb to 45000 may have had some structural effect that prompted a return, hence the westward direction afterwards (?).

                                Also it is possible that the a/c was hit by some debris from the meteor/comet that struck the cockpit area hence no further control/ comunication but ability to continue in flight.

                                I forget the cause, but a few years ago an airliner received some kind of hit and did land safely with a great hole in the spine just aft of the cockpit.

                                Alex

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